Heart Attack: A Proven Risk Avandia and Avandia-containing Drugs

There are hundreds of medications against which the US Food and Drug Administration has issued a Black Box Warning – the strongest warning that this branch of US government can issue due to the drugs’ proven life-threatening effects. One of the drugs that have been issued this particular warning is Avandia, also known as Rosiglitazone, which the FDA approved in 1999 and which was once GlaxoSmithKline’s (formerly SmithKlineBeecham Corporation, before its merger with Glaxo Wellcome) second most sold product.

Avandia or Rosiglitazone is recommended to patients suffering from Type II diabetes, a chronic illness wherein the body fails to control the level of sugar in the blood; this sugar, or glucose, is the body’s key source of energy. Glaxo has also produced Avandia in combination with other drugs. Thus, there is Avandaryl, where Rosiglitazone is combined with glimepiride, and Avandamet, the combination of Rosiglitazone and metformin.

Due to the risk of serious side-effects, specifically heart diseases that can lead to death, the FDA, in February of 2011, required the inclusion of the cardiovascular risks and risk of heart attack on the drug’s patient Medication Guide and physician labeling. This was actually preceded by the agency’s announcement in September 2010 that it will strictly restrict the prescription and use of the drug (and all Avandia–containing drugs) by Type 2 diabetes patients.

The known minor and life-threatening side-effects related to Avandia are back pain, blurred vision, osteoporosis, severe allergic reaction, bone fractures, hyperflycemia, myocardial ischemia, stroke and heart attack.

The National Injury Law Center, which continues to answer hundreds of patients with their questions on bad medications and harmful medical procedures, as well as help them in their legal actions against manufacturers or liable individuals, states in an article posted in their website that fluid retention, which can very well result or aggravate congestive heart failure (wherein the heart fails to supply sufficient blood to different body parts), is another severe effect of Rosiglitazone.

Glaxo’s decision not to warn the public of Avandia’s side-effects, due mainly to its contention that its product does not increase risk of heart attack, is a clear indication of negligence. This is enough to hold the company fully accountable to all the severe effects and deaths caused by Avandia.

One Response to “Heart Attack: A Proven Risk Avandia and Avandia-containing Drugs”

  1. In addition to the slew of product liability lawsuits Glaxo will invariably face, hiding facts about the risks of a drug should cause the government to hit them with criminal charges. They should not be suffered to play with peoples’ lives for profits like this.

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